The South as a colony: Then & now

In 1775 the South was a colony, owned by relatives in England who showered economic protective benefits upon us, generally shared our values (in both the monarchy and established church), protected us from invasion and viewed us as countrymen. Taxes were low, our social institutions were protected and Enlightenment radicalism was kept at bay. The South was connected to her sister plantation colonies in the Caribbean and part of a well-ordered, prosperous empire which intruded little upon us.

In 1866 the South was a colony, owned by a hated enemy who had just burned down our cities, ended our independence and killed a quarter million of us. Our US masters were people who did not share our values, gave our former slaves political power over us, cut down our vast forests, stole our best land, imposed high taxes and intrusive regulations upon us and economically exploited us for more than a century.

Flag-Pins-Great-Britain-Confederate-battle

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  1. A somewhat unrelated rant; the virulently anti-Southern comments on the Huffpo articles concerning the recent tornadoes and floods, are instructive. Those people literally think that they’re the only one’s who work and pay taxes. They also seem to think that the Southern people have exclusive control their government, an obvious projection, and are responsible for all of the problems north of the Ohio river/Mason-Dixon line. It’s also obvious that they regard the South as a possession and not a group of states sharing equal status with them.

    I’d recommend that any Southron who still thinks that these people are our “fellow” countrymen, or are the same people as us, look at these remarks.

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  2. The South was connected to her sister plantation colonies in the Caribbean and part of a well-ordered, prosperous empire which intruded little upon us.

    But..but..but Don’t Tread on Me!!!!

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    • Hey there, homosexual activist in Baltimore. Our heroes were proven right on nearly all counts. Their legacy is an inspiration to us. While I take no pleasure in seeing civilization destroyed around me, SNs of years gone by are daily proven right by the failure of democracy, equality and forced unionism.

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      • Michael, I understand your view, but don’t you recognize the difference between the new Southern Nationalism and the old guard? The old guard was deeply entrenched in politics. Many of the CSA’s leaders were former US government leaders. That’s the difference that I see between what you are doing and what they did. At this point, your views have been so severely demonized that it has become nearly impossible for them to spread. Sure, a lot of Americans are fed up with our government, but I doubt that they are going to look to people like you and Brad for leadership. Even I don’t like everything about Americanism. There are no Southern Nationalists in political power and all I’m saying is that is the greatest difference I see between the old and the new guard (oh, and the fact that there’s no slavery to contend with today.) Beyond that, I don’t see any difference between the likes of you guys and the old guard.

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        • Yes, we are not part of the system the way Jeff Davis and even Rhett were. That’s true. We are not really conservatives, as they were. Things do change though. Who could have predicted Trump and the fact that Jeb Bush could spend $40-60 million and have huge establishment support running on a liberal GOP platform and yet get absolutely no support from the people, especially in the South. Undoubtedly we will not see an exact repeat of 1830-1861. What is paramount is that our people survives and gains a stronger sense of identity as this system implodes.

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    • Because you are a known enemy who has employed underhanded methods to destroy those with whom you disagree.

      I am certainly not on the level of Rhett or Calhoun. But I am doing my best to carry on their struggle for our people.

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