Proclaiming justice among the ruins

One of the tendancies we see of Southerners in denial about the sad state of their homeland today is an embrace of constitutionalism – a belief that our enemies are simply misinformed and that if we educate them on the issues and point out the constitutional arguments in our favor that they will come over to our side.

Southern historian Richard Weaver wrote in The Southern Tradition at Bay: A History of Postbellum Thought that this was going on after the Northern subjugation of the Confederacy and has its roots in Antebellum society. Weaver wrote:

Since every system of education is ultimately a tool of the state, the controlling point of view will be that which the state visualizes as its chief source of welfare. In one society it may be commercial skill; in another science and invention. In the Old South it was an ad hoc humanism which produced the gentleman scholar and the political soldier. When one considers this education and this temperment, it comes as no surprise that in the era following Appomattox many Southerners felt impelled to re-enter the forum. Nearly all of them believed that the various Northern statements of the origin of the war rested not only upon misinterpretations of the “constitutional compact” – a phrase dear to Southerners of legal training – but also upon shallow and sophistical theories of society. It was a matter of proclaiming justice among the ruins, but the powerful polemic vein which had run from Patrick Henry to Calhoun and Yancey continued in appreciable volume for more than fifteen years after the collapse of the Confederacy.

This polemic persists in a much degraded form today due to that social marginalization of the Southern cause. I have witnessed it at demonstrations where, when faced with open hostility from anti-Southern and/or anti-White protesters our side sought to educate the enraged enemy. Countless times I have seen those on our side write wordy articles online seeking to inform the other side as to the “truth of history” and the “constitutional justice” – as if the enemy accepts us as a valid participant in a social or legal debate and will change its behavior should we somehow “prove” that we were right.

While reaching out to our people and awakening a national consciousness in them let us not waste time proclaiming justice among the ruins. It won’t fix the ghettos of Atlanta or Birmingham. It won’t close our borders or end the attacks on few remaining liberties. It won’t give us back control of our media or educational system. Power will come from awakening our people, individual by individul, and strongly asserting to our people our right to survive and decide our own future here in our land. We will not convince the enemy who is sworn to destoy us of the rightness of our cause. But we certainly can awaken our own people and begin building again. This is what we seek to do here at SF: reach out to Southern folks (as well as those related peoples friendly to our cause) and let them know that we are a national people – a blood and soil community – and we must band together to survive and prosper in the future.

ghetto

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